A tea is a small amount of fresh or dried herb brewed for a short time. An infusion is a larger amount of dried herb brewed for a long time. An infusion extracts more vitamins and minerals than a tincture and more medicinal qualities and nutrients than a tea.

Leaves -crumble leaves just before using. Tea: I usually use approx. oneteaspoonful of the dried per cup of boiling water, steeped about 10minutes, or, as a general rule, 3 tsps. of fresh herb leaves to one cup ofboiling water; Infusion: 1 oz. of herb to one quart of water for a minimm of 4 hours. I infuse oatstraw overnight

See Oatstraw

Roots - break, grind,or powder roots just before using. Teas: steeping onthe average about 20 minutes; Infusion: 1 oz. of herb to one pint of water for a minimum of 8 hours.

Seeds - powder or crush just before using. Tea: I crush a heapingteaspoonful of fennel seeds in a mortar and pestle and brew for 6-8 minutes;anise seed for 5 minutes; Infusion: 1 oz. of seeds or berries to one pint of water for a maximum of 30 minutes.

Flowers - Tea: brewed for approx. 5-10 minutes; Infusion: 1 oz. of flowers to one quart of water for a maximum of 2 hours.

Or you could make Sun Tea. Take a handful each of, forinstance, applemint, peppermint, lemon balm and bee balm leaves in a gallonjug of water, cover, and set in the sun early in the day. The infrared andultraviolet rays of the sun heat the water but not to boiling. Flavour isreleased from the herbs, but not from the oils and acids that can give teaan acrid taste. Set the jug in the sun for 3-6 hours. This method justworks for leaves - not seeds and roots.

Sweetening

Besides the normal sweeteners, you can use licorice root, someflower buds, or stevia. I don't use any sweetener except for an occasionalanise hyssop flower or dried stevia leaf.